I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Statistics at The University of Rhode Island. I was previously a postdoc in the Department of Mathematics and the Computation and Biology Group in CSAIL at MIT, working with Professor Bonnie Berger. I received my Ph.D in computer science from Tufts University in 2013. My doctoral advisor was Professor Lenore Cowen. My dissertation is “Remote homology detection in proteins using graphical models”

I am working on algorithms for huge data sets, primarily in computational biology, but also in astronomy and social networks. My research includes “compressive genomics,” which co-opts data compression to accelerate analysis on large genomic data sets. I have also worked extensively in structural bioinformatics, and am also interested in programming languages and functional programming. Most fundamentally, I am interested in how nature makes seemingly intractable problems tractable (such as protein folding).

In the past, I have been involved with several interesting companies including Panjiva, IntrinsiQ, and Analog Devices.

My hobbies include motorsports; I instruct with North Atlantic Audi Club, Audi Club North America, BMW Car Club of America, and COM Sports Car Club. For a few years, I competed in 24 Hours of LeMons.

I play the violin, and also enjoy cycling, running, and exploring movement at Gymnasia (I’m still trying to perfect a handstand and a muscle-up). I live in North Kingstown, RI with my wife, Rachel, and three ferrets.

My Erdös number is 3 (through both Lenore Cowen and Bonnie Berger).

Cocchi

Cocchi

Pimm

Pimm

Raven

Raven